The Day Talkaoke Came to Town

The Day Talkaoke Came to Town

talkaoke-bridportFood Festival goers of all ages – including several canine punters – had great fun exploring all kinds of issues at the dynamic, interactive Talkaoke at this year’s Food Festival.

Host Mikey Weinkove from The People Speak energetically juggled opinions, rants and shy whispers from guests at the Table of Chat on everything from the EU referendum to population growth, globalisation, kindness and the sugar tax. Thanks also to members of Transition Town Bridport who helped make the Talkaoke a great success.

If you took part, you’ll know how much fun it was and if you didn’t, you missed a treat.

See cameraman Rick Sleiman’s pictures and watch live footage of the Talkaoke here!

What does Brexit mean for Eating Better?

What does Brexit mean for Eating Better?

Eating Better is one of 85 organisations that have written to Prime Minister Theresa May and new Secretary of State for exiting the European Union, David Davis, urging the Brexit Government to take control of food, farming and fisheries for public good.

The impact that the EU referendum will have for our food and farming is hugely uncertain. With many of the UK’s food and farming policies and subsidies being defined at EU level, the UK government now has an opportunity to reshape these to ensure that taxpayers money is spent for public good.

In the letter, organisations representing the health and long-term interests of millions of British citizens have called on government to adopt common-sense food, farming and fishing policies that are good for jobs, health and the environment, when they plan the UK’s post-referendum strategy.

The letter, co-ordinated by Eating Better partner organisation, Sustain: the alliance for better food and farming, has been co-signed by over 80 food, farming, fair trade, poverty, animal welfare, wildlife and environmental organisations.

Our joint statement points out that better food, farming and trade policies can help to cut greenhouse gas emissions from farming and food industries by 80% by 2050, and promote healthier diets to combat heart disease, cancers, diabetes and obesity, saving the NHS, and ultimately taxpayers millions. Such policies can also support a vibrant and diverse economy, supporting good jobs and working conditions, in the UK and overseas.

Further, the UK could prioritise ethical and sustainable production methods, improved animal welfare, more farmland and marine wildlife, a healthy future for bees and other pollinators, as well as enhancing the beauty of the countryside and protecting the environment, whilst also providing a safe and traceable food supply.

“The British public has given no mandate for a reduction in food and farming standards, a weakening of protection for nature, nor a reversal of the UK’s commitment to lifting millions of the poorest people in the world out of poverty through trade. We are seriously concerned that such vital considerations may be over-run by a drive for new trade deals at any cost.” says Kath Dalmeny, head of Sustain.

The signatory organisations also ask David Davis MP to ensure that the advice the new unit provides to Government is drawn up in consultation with people with science, health and sustainability expertise in relation to food, farming and fishing, alongside economic concerns. Further, the signatory organisations urge that food, farming and fishing make up one of the Options Papers being developed by the unit, to advise the PM and the Government.

Read the full press release here.

Elena Salazar, Campaigns and Communications Associate, Eating Better

Enjoy fresh, fantastic food, fine art and funky vintage this Easter Sunday!

Enjoy fresh, fantastic food, fine art and funky vintage this Easter Sunday!

Following her research into local sourcing for Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset last year, Tamsin Chandler started a drive to bring a new food market to the town. The research for CLS revelead a disconnect in our local food system: the biggest problem food producers face is getting their produce to the public, while the public are keen to buy locally produced foods but don’t know where to find them.

“I put two and two together and spoke to lots of people,” says Tamsin. “Everyone agreed a weekly food market would be great for producers, shoppers and the town so I set about making it happen. We have a ridiculous amount of great food producers in the area and my dream is to have an almost entirely local food market.”

This Easter Sunday the local community food market launches in The Cattle Market, St Michael’s Estate, trading from 9am till 3pm. Wherever possible, Bridport Food Market will host growers, farmers and producers within a 12 mile radius and be genuinely representative of the food being produced in or near Bridport from small scale growers such as hobby-farmers, allotmenteers and smallholders right up to more established, successful brands. Quality and variety will be the primary focus, along with affordability and accessibility for all.

Bridport Food Market addresses a clear need and will deliver several benefits including:

  • providing local growers, farmers & producers of all sizes affordable access to customers
  • Offering a viable alternative to supermarkets when people do their weekly food shop
  • Creating employment opportunities
  • Adding to Bridport’s already popular and vibrant reputation as an important market town
  • Drawing footfall to St Michael’s Estate & its resident Sunday trading businesses
  • Boosting Bridport’s reputation as a ‘foodie town’ within the flourishing British food & drink market

FFI CONTACT:
Tamsin Chandler   m: 07834 547 880  e: tamsinchandler@gmail.com   w: bridportfoodmarket.co.uk

Good Practice Guide for Food Businesses

Good Practice Guide for Food Businesses

As part of its work to spread sustainability, CLS in Dorset has worked in conjunction with WSX Enterprise to bring you this Good Practice Guide for Food Businesses, with sections on saving money by saving water and energy, reducing food waste, involving staff and telling customers. Chair of Bridport Local Food Group Jay Anderson commented: “This is a useful guide that will be a good reminder/check list of simple actions many people should already be aware of.”