Bridport Local Food Map Report & Findings

Bridport Local Food Map Report & Findings

As part of its campaign to make local and sustainable food more visible to the general public in Bridport, Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset (CLS) commissioned research from Tamsin Chandler, Independent Food Business Consultant, into the sourcing practices of town centre food retailers, cafes, pubs, restaurants and nearby farm shops to form the basis for a new town local food map. You can read the report here.

Bridport food pioneers! Join us on a journey to a more sustainable diet

Bridport food pioneers! Join us on a journey to a more sustainable diet

Take the foodfuture challenge in 2015:
  • We import 40% of our food and 95% of our fruit usually from places with growing populations and reducing water resources.
  • We spend £196 billion a year on food and drink in the UK but less than 5% of this goes to the actual producers
  • Our global food system contributes up to 50% of greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation, soil erosion, packaging, freezing, transportation, waste and more
It’s time for more of us to directly invest in our LOCAL food economy. Let’s make simple changes to what we eat and how we shop and we can cool the planet with every bite…

SPEND A TENNER LOCALLY

Twenty one people pledged to Love Local Food and Spend a Tenner Locally at last weekend’s Bridport Food Festival. This fun challenge was launched as part of the Festival’s newest area: the foodfuture Grow Your Own Patch – a collaboration with Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset, Groves Nurseries, Washingpool Farm Shop, Plan B’s Everyday Salads and HOME in Bridport.
Foodfuture is the new umbrella in town for all those who want to buy and eat food that’s good for people, good for animals and good for the planet.
“Who doesn’t enjoy talking about food?” asks Linda Hull, food co-ordinator for Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset which has developed the foodfuture project. “People were really willing to talk about their favourite foods, where they shop and many enthusiastically took up the challenge to Spend a Tenner on locally produced food from now on.”
Pledgemakers received free entry into a draw to win a breakfast for two at Soulshine and a copy of “Your Local Shopping List” detailing producers of everything you could possibly need from fruit and veg, meat and fish, eggs and dairy, bread and baked goods, condiments, preserves, drinks – all of it available within a 5 mile radius, with many more producers situated within 15 miles. Those taking part all agreed to be contacted in a couple of months’ time to see how they were getting on with keeping their pledges.
“Shopping for food like this lets you use your economic power to support the kind of food system you want and transforms the weekly shop into an investment tool for a more sustainable planet.” says Linda. “And it keeps money local too: if all 7000 households in town did this every week it would be a £70,000 – or £3.5 million a year – boost to the local economy.”
 “We know that lots of people like to buy local food and we are totally blessed with amazing local food around Bridport so the aim of the Spend a Tenner campaign is to bring all this bounty to many more people’s attention!”, said Linda.
The SPEND A TENNER LOCALLY challenge is a new fun way to learn more about local food in Bridport and how to feast our way to wiser food choices. It’s part of foodfuture Bridport, a project initiated and supported by Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset, setting out to help people access good local and sustainable food.

ONE POT CHALLENGE

Meanwhile in another part of Bridport Food Festival last Saturday, Blake Ford, 10, from Symondsbury School, was announced first prize winner in a brand new schools sustainable cooking competition.
The Festival teamed up with foodfuture Bridport, Ecoschools, Communities Living Sustainably plus street food businesses Stewed and Baked and Pizza Dragon to create a cooking challenge with a twist. Children from 4 of Bridport’s Primary Schools took part in devising recipes for sustainable family meals which protect health, support the local economy and are good for the planet too.
Blake submitted ‘My Dorset Tagine’ as his response to the One Pot Challenge. Blake’s Dorset Tagine put local seasonal ingredients together with some exotic fair trade spices to produce a simple recipe which could use meat, fish or be vegetarian. This adaptability helped to win him top marks for being appetizing and imaginative as well as healthy and sustainable. Blake wins a £25 voucher kindly donated by Groves Nurseries for his school to spend.
Daisy Smith’s ‘West Country Fish and Noodle Soup’ came a close second with third place going to Team 2’s ‘Herby Spring Chicken’ from St Catherine’s School. Entries were also received from Burton Bradstock and Powerstock Primary Schools. Mayor Sandra Brown presented the prizes and certificates.
The One Pot Challenge continues as the judges’ feedback on submitted recipes will be built into exciting hands on cooking sessions with Giles Smith, street food trader and proprietor of Stewed and Baked. Giles will be driving his unit into schools to do a series of cook-offs with students combining essential knowledge of the curriculum with a fun hands-on experience in a designer street food truck.
***************************************************************************We’re looking for the first 1% of people in town to join the foodfuture challenge to set off on a food adventure: the journey to a more sustainable diet – one that’s good for you, good for animals and good for the planet.
What will you pledge to do?
We’re working with schools, shoppers and businesses to make one change to the food we eat, helping to boost the local economy and move towards more sustainable ways of eating.
For shoppers
Spend a Tenner Locally and choose one product to buy locally from now on.
For businesses
Pledge an action in support of the Foodfuture Charter to feature on the foodfuture local food map.
For schools
Take the One Pot Challenge – sustainable recipes designed by local children, perfected in the mobile kitchen.

DO YOU HAVE A SPARE FIVE MINUTES?

Take our quick online survey about your shopping and eating habits and you could win a delicious breakfast at Soulshine Cafe.
Simply by buying seasonal foods produced locally – and sold independently – we can reduce the pollution and waste caused by transporting food around the world while keeping more wealth circulating locally, supporting local livelihoods and keeping skills alive too.
Every £10 you spend on locally produced food in local shops is worth £17.60 to the local economy. Buying food in this way transforms the weekly shop into an investment tool for a more sustainable planet.
To sign up for the foodfuture challenge 2015 and receive your free FOODFUTURE SHOPPING LIST simply contact us:
Visit www.foodfuturebridport.org.uk   email linda@da21.org.uk   or call 07834 561219